call-me-loop (1)

The Influence Room Podcast- Changing the dialogue Call Me Loop - Singer, Songwriter

Posted on Jan 22, 2020 11:27:02 AM

Today, we talk to the beautiful pop singer and songwriter, Call Me Loop. She talks to us about how she got into the world of music, the ups and downs in the process and how social media has an influence on the industry.


Overview

Loop is a pop singer, songwriter from South London who has been creating music for about three and a half years. She recalls her love for music began at a young age, when she realised she was able to sing. With her parents encouraging her to pursue this talent, they took her to a recording studio to record her first ever song on her 14th birthday.

After graduating from university doing drama, she decided she wanted to fully pursue her dream of becoming a singer. Whilst also attending acting workshops, she was also trying out for girl band auditions. She describes this experience as a vital part of her journey as it pushed her out of her comfort zone and was an important learning curve in her music career.

After taking a break from singing due to severe glandular fever, she started reaching out to small time producers to share her music. After being put in touch with someone from Island Records, she finally had her first single released.

Loop reveals that she was unsure what her sound was until her first single came out and she then realised that pop music was definitely more her. With her first ever release ‘Looking At You’ reaching over 100,000 streams within its first 24 hours on Spotify, she describes this as a very memorable and surreal moment for her.

Now looking to the future, she is set to spend time out in LA in the spring to write new music and gets ready for the busy festival season ahead.

Five quick takeaways:

  1. Social media has been very helpful in becoming discoverable and gives you the ability to talk to fans on Instagram.
  2. She personally feels that everyone in the industry, especially female artists, are really supportive.
  3. At times working in the music business you can feel quite isolated.
  4. As a pop-artist she feels she needs Instagram as a way to connect with her fans, as they want to see her real life.
  5. The average age of her fans are between 16 and 30, which is a lot older than expected for a young pop singer. 

If you enjoyed this episode and don’t want to miss the rest of the series, you can follow The Influence Room Podcast on Spotify and Apple iTunes podcasts.


 

Full audio transcription

Bronagh:

Hello and welcome to the Influence Room Podcast, the show that explores influence from every perspective. Our guest this week is pop singer, songwriter, Call Me Loop who's part of the amazing music group Tile Yard. In our interview, we're going to talk about how she got her started in music, the ins and outs of the songwriting process, and the influence of social media for emerging artists. Really hope you enjoy the interview.

Bronagh:

Hello and welcome to the Influence Room Podcast, the show that explores all ends of the spectrum of influence. Today we've got a fantastic new guest. I'm really excited because music is a really big passion of mine and I love meeting new artists. So Loop, thank you so much for joining us today.

Call Me Loop:

Thank you for having me.

Bronagh:

So for anyone who might not know who you are, tell us a little bit about yourself.

Call Me Loop:

I'm a pop singer, songwriter from South London. I've been putting music out for about three and a half years. I'm independent. And you can find my stuff everywhere, Spotify and everything under Call Me Loop.

Bronagh:

Amazing. And so tell us how you got into music. When did you first realise that that was your calling in life?

Call Me Loop:

Probably when I was about five. I started writing poems and singing. I was very much pop through and through from the start. So I was listening to Steps on my cassette player and stuff. 

Milly:

Who didn't. That's my childhood.

Call Me Loop:

Yeah. I can remember just sitting in the back of the car with my little Steps on my Walkman, so good.

Milly:

Walkman too.

Call Me Loop:

I know, those are the days and yeah, just I loved pop. I was singing, I think when I realised I could sing and then I started writing songs so I'd be that annoying girl at school. I'd write songs and get my friends to sing them with me in break time and get the other girls in the year to listen.

Milly:

Girl band vibes.

Call Me Loop:

Yeah. And then my parents, they were very encouraging of it. They bought me a little karaoke machine. It was so cool. You could play a CD and then sing along with the microphone and it would tape you onto the cassette so then you could listen back.

Milly:

Nice.

Bronagh:

Early demos.

Call Me Loop:

Yeah, exactly.

Milly:

Do you still have them?

Call Me Loop:

I actually probably do, my mum will do, she's a hoarder of that sort of stuff. She can't throw away anything sentimental.

Milly:

Should release them.

Call Me Loop:

I should.

Milly:

The original.

Call Me Loop:

I was always doing Destiny's Child's Emotions. That was one of my favorite ones. And obviously Christina Aguilera, Stripped, my favorite album of all time. Yeah. And then my 14th birthday, they got me a day in a recording studio. So I went and recorded Hero by Mariah Carey, so that was the first experience in a recording studio, which was amazing. So yeah, I've just been doing it since I was tiny, really.

Bronagh:

And are your parents musical or is there anyone in your family who's been in the business?

Call Me Loop:

No, no one's musical. I've got creative, like artistic aunts and uncles and I think my Nana did sing in a jazz club. But for the most part, no it was purely, I think just from my love of pop music and realising that somehow I could sing.

Bronagh:

Because I guess that's where there's this sort of... It's those practical steps because I know a lot of us will have, that is kind of one of the early careers that you always imagine, like, "I want to be a pop star," but there's sort of a point where you realise, "Right, how do I make this into a career?" When did you see that shift?

Call Me Loop:

After university. So I didn't want to go to uni. Well I wasn't averse to it, but my parents said you have to uni and get a degree and then you can pursue music if you want to. So I did that. I did drama at uni.

Bronagh:

And were you performing while you were at uni?

Call Me Loop:

No, and I should have. People ask this and I'm like, "God, I really missed a trick there." But I think I just already had felt, even though it's so isn't, I was doing way more hours than all my friends who were studying history and stuff. It was a lot of work drama compared to other courses in terms of contact hours and then also I just quite enjoyed the uni lifestyle. So I was at Exeter and it had some great open mic nights and stuff, so I should have really tapped into that. But I think I was just like, "I'm going to focus on this, focus on acting and having a good time."

Call Me Loop:

And then after when I graduated, that's when I kind of was like, "Okay, how do I make this happen?" And I think it was also that to an extent, I didn't play any instruments and I didn't study music, so I think I probably was putting off that thing of, "I actually don't know how I really start to get into this." Because it pretty hard if you don't have any contacts and you've never... It's like-

Milly:

Where do I go from here?

Call Me Loop:

Yeah, where do I start?

Bronagh:

And where were you living at the time?

Call Me Loop: 

So, after uni I went back to my parents. Yeah, near Gilford.

Bronagh:

Because I always find if you're not in the London bubble, the music industry in the UK I guess has been so London centric for such a long time. And I think there are artists that are now coming through that aren't that sort of traditional London ready-made musician. You've got Aitch who's representing kind of Northern rap. And Lewis Capaldi, obviously, huge Scottish success. But how did you find... Did you have anyone to turn to, to ask for advice?

Call Me Loop:

Not really. So I was at my parents, I was also then after uni because obviously needed to start building up my CV and also earn some money. So I was doing kind of internships and things in the week and then on weekends... I also still wanted to carry on my acting. So on the Sundays I was doing this London Actors workshop and on Saturdays I was like, "Okay this is my music day." Because again, I didn't really know what I was doing, I started doing things like going up to London for girl band auditions and stuff.

Bronagh:

How did you find that?

Call Me Loop:

Every single one told me I should be a solo artist.

Bronagh:

Okay. Good. And look at you now.

Call Me Loop:

I know. They obviously were right. But it was fun. It was really good experience. And also put me out my comfort zone a bit, because you go up, although to be fair there were a couple that were quite dodgy, but it's learning curve.

Milly:

Is that how I imagine it like the X Factor? Where they're like, "We're going to put you together." 

Call Me Loop:

Yeah, there's a big group of girls and they're like, "You guys kind of come together," and then you learn a dance and then you learn a song.

Milly:

So it literally is.

Call Me Loop:

Yeah, it depended on the thing. Some of them were a bit dodgy, some were a bit more professional.

Bronagh:

Where were you sourcing those interviews?

Call Me Loop:

Online. Things like Star Now and stuff. But there was one that was a bit dodgy and a couple of those where you go up and you get there and you're like, "This is not official. And then you go back to the website and they're like, "Please don't contact this person. We realise this is not official." And you're like, 'shit'.

Milly: 

"I should've checked."

Call Me Loop:

Yeah. So I basically was kind of... And then I basically burnt myself out doing that because I was essentially working seven days a week. And then I got really bad glandular fever, which made me bed bound for like three months and it weirdly split my vocal chords. It was a weird side effect. I don't know how it happened and that was when I think I had the wake up call because I just remember sobbing to my dad in our living room being like, "Oh my God, what if I can't sing again?"

Call Me Loop:

But I got speech therapy and then started to build it back up again. And then I was like, "Okay, I need to figure out what the hell I'm doing here." And then I went down to working three days a week. And on those days off at my parents, I would just sit on my laptop, I bought a little mini keyboard, downloaded Logic, started to try and make some really, really amateur beats. And I was reaching out, cold emailing producers I found on SoundCloud that looked like they were cool and sounded like something I liked but had very tiny numbers so were more likely to get back to me. And just started doing that and started making the occasional session happen. And then actually my friend then started working at Island Records. So I asked her if she had anybody that I could maybe meet and I went to meet a guy called Louis Brown and he really liked one of the songs that I had. And then he put that out. And that was my first single.

Bronagh:

Wow, because that's it. I guess for a lot of people it's the having that sort of... It's you have to be quite entrepreneurial in a way when you're starting on this music, especially because I've always find that if you're a writer but you don't play an instrument, it's how do you build that framework to get a body of work?

Call Me Loop:

Exactly.

Bronagh:

But I think quite a lot of musicians put a lot of pressure on themselves for it to be perfect, but actually you use the writer, you need to go into those producer sessions and just come at it with a bit of an energy. Because that's where the alchemy happens, it's like you have an artist who comes in and then it's the producer's job to bring that out. Are there any really memorable sessions where you almost landed on your sound or it sort of just clicked?

Call Me Loop:

Not in those earlier days, I don't think. I was still very much figuring it out. I mean, it took me a couple of years to figure out my sound. But there was definitely... So I was doing, like did a session with a guy called Miguel who was Portuguese but was in London with a guy that I knew and we wrote this song and then it was in a sort of format of some kind, but then I send it to him in Portugal and he was like, "I'm going to work on it." And he sends it back and it was so different to what I'd been working on, because the stuff before had been a bit more like a Banks kind of vibe, moody, electronic pop.

Call Me Loop:

But then this song, Looking At You, which became my first single, he sent it back and I was like, "Oh shit, this is like..." It was more fun, big pop kind of thing. And I was like, "Actually, this feels way more me." And then, yeah. That's the one that Louis picked out and he was like, "We'd actually really like to put this out as a try one single deal thing." This was with a little, he'd left Island at this point, so this was with a little independent label. So that was probably the start of the Loop sound.

Bronagh:

The journey.

Call Me Loop:

The very beginning. Yeah.

Bronagh:

So then to kind of touch on the word influence, who would you say were your influences around that time? Because I know Banks really did create a very distinctive sound and I guess then it's hard when you are trying to figure out who you are, finding inspiration but not just essentially like-

Call Me Loop:

Copying.

Bronagh:

Yes. How do you get that balance?

Call Me Loop:

I think... I mean, like I said, I've always been pop through and through, but then things like, I mean Banks, she's pop, but she's obviously a bit more left field pop. And around the time I think... Maybe that was around the FKA Twigs starting to come out and stuff. And so I was really loving that sort of stuff. But I think, like I say, I knew it wasn't quite me. I'm definitely more like bright, straight down the middle pop. So it was marrying the two a bit. And my earlier singles definitely were a little more left-field pop. So I think I'm always going to have that pop thing that overrides, and I do listen mostly to pop, but then there's other things like I love The Kooks and Tame Impala and Hot Chip. And so it's just always going to be a bit of an amalgamation. And then lyrically I'm always writing just from my experiences. So it's almost always about relationships and things I've actually been through.

Milly: 

Classic pop.

Call Me Loop:

Yeah, exactly.

Milly:  

A love song.

Bronagh:

So what is the writing process for someone who's listening that wouldn't have a clue how a song gets made? Tell us about that.

Call Me Loop: 

So I think it's so personal. But for me now when I go into sessions, I usually... When I'm writing for myself, I don't usually have any preconceived ideas. I don't usually go in with title ideas. If you're going through something, obviously you have a bit of... You probably know which way it's going to go or roughly what you're going to be talking about, because that's just natural. It's what's going to come out. But for me, I very much go and be like, "I think I'm in the mood for this kind of vibe," or, "Let's use this as a reference." One or two songs maybe. And then just as the producer starts to get the beat going, then I'll be like, "Okay..." And then just melody and lyrics come from there.

Bronagh:

So will you write in the session?

Call Me Loop:

Yeah, yeah. Write and record in the day and then you get kind of a demo and then, I've just got so many demos and then you go back and like, "Okay, I'm feeling this one, this one." You get a bit of a shortlist together and you think, "Okay, maybe this one's going to be a new single or..."

Milly:

So quick, that process. It's incredible.

Call Me Loop:

Yeah, it's weird, that's the thing. So when you are doing multiple sessions a week, you've literally got-

Milly:

Like 30 songs.

Call Me Loop:

New three or four songs every week which is... That's why it's frustrating when you are only putting out maybe one song every three months because you're like, "But there's so many." And that's why it's so hard picking your singles because it's literally whether your career might go this way or that way and there's so many that you love, but it might be as well that you love one, but it's sitting slightly outside of the sound of the last two that you've done. And you're like, "Do I go with something more consistent or do I show off a bit of a breadth?" And there's so many factors in deciding, which is actually why this my next single, it's out in January or February, we'll see. I got my fans to decide on tour. So literally, I played three demos and then they picked their favorite and that's going to be a single. So I don't have to worry about the decision.

Milly:

Well I guess they are your people, so...

Call Me Loop:

It's for them.

Bronagh:

And before we started recording, I think you touched on quite an interesting point where music can be very of the moment. And so I guess, looking at songwriting, it's an idea and it exists and it might be that idea isn't just quite right for whatever the, I don't know, pop culture themes are. Because this track that you've been working on, Self Love, I think that we are really having a moment where a lot of people are starting to open up more and be vulnerable. Whereas maybe a song like that might not have connected with people, say like five years ago.

Call Me Loop:

Yeah, yeah, completely.

Bronagh:

So it's like how do you get the balance of holding back idea... Who is the person that signs that off and says, "Okay. I think that's a great song but let's just sit on it for a while."?

Call Me Loop:

Yeah. I don't know really. I guess for the most part I feel like pop music is more like you say, it's kind of relationships and it doesn't go quite as deep sometimes. But then I also feel like currently there's a lot more pop music that's coming out with strong messages. There's political messages in pop music. There's like you say, like Lizzo, she's got all this self-love messaging and because you say it, it's come at the perfect time that it's just blowing up because it's what everybody wants to hear. And you want to give your fans or listeners an empowering message for the most part.

Call Me Loop:

And obviously there are songs that are sad and you need to wallow as well. But yeah, I mean I think you can't really... I don't think that you can really read too much. You've got to just put out the music you want to put out and how you feel and you've got to think about what's going to connect, but also you can't get to weighed down on that. You've got to just be like, "I love this song and I want to put it out." And this one's true to me right now.

Bronagh:

Yeah, because I mean Lizzo it's her third... Is it her third album?

Call Me Loop:

I think something like that. She posted something actually the other day, which I reposted on my story, which was something about her being like, "Eight years of nos and failed this and people turning me away and this and that and having 32 cents, sleeping in my car, and now who I am. This is me as an overnight success." That kind of thing, because people are always like, "Oh where's she come from?" It's like she's been working for 8 years. 

Milly:

You haven't seen her background. I was going to ask actually about, how you found the music industry and that come up and all of that sort of stuff.

Call Me Loop:

The music industry in general?

Milly:

Yeah, just like your experience of it as a singer songwriter? Because I know that would be slightly different to those who just come in and just sing other people's songs and things like that.

Call Me Loop:

True. I mean it's hard. It's like, I would always want to be a writer as well, I think. I write my own songs co-write obviously. It's great to be in a room with other people and like I say, I don't write any music. I'm not a producer. So you need to have that room where you can bounce ideas. But I mean it's a hard industry. I feel like anybody in any part of it will tell you that. And things take longer than you think they're going to take. I have to tell my mom this. And it's taught me patience because I'm quite an impatient person and quite like knee jerk, if I want something to happen, I want it to happen now. But things take time. You have to think about the long game, your six month, year, two year goals and stuff. It's very up and down.

Call Me Loop:

But I think it's the same as anything where you're being artistic or creative or freelance. It's trying, but it's really fun and if it's true to you and it's your actual dream, then it's amazing. And it's just things like you have to be careful not to compare yourself too much to people in a similar situation to you, similar genre because there's enough space for everybody. But it is that thing of social media as well. And it's kind of hard to also step back and turn your brain off. My brain is going all the time. I feel the same as, like you said, almost entrepreneurial. You're almost like the CEO of your brand and because it never really sleeps. You can be doing things weekends, nights, you have ideas all the time. You can be out somewhere and you'd be like, "Ooh, that relates. I could do..." Whether it's write about that or I should talk to my branding person or my PR or my management about that because that could be great. It's quite nonstop. So it's exhausting, but it's fun.

Milly:

Promise.

Bronagh:

And just to touch on that, I think a lot of senior record label people now are like, "You have to be your authentic self and authenticity and..." And it can be very hard for someone to be their authentic self all the time on social media and have to... I think artists have to give so much of themselves now. I just think if you look at someone like Mariah Carey, she didn't have an Instagram when she was launched as an artist. It was very much billboard advertising and radio. Whereas now an artist has to almost like open up their private lives and be really, really vulnerable.

Call Me Loop:

Yeah. It is quite mad. I feel like some people choose not to do that, but I feel like as a pop artist for the most part, you kind of do need to do that. Because it's your brand, it's your outward face, people want to see what you're up to in real life, what music you're doing all the time. And I actually love Insta-storying and stuff. I'm an overshare in every aspect anyway. You can tell it from my music and I'm like the person that just chats and chats and tells too much to the person I've just met.

Milly:

Love that. It's good in this situation.

Call Me Loop:

So I'm always Insta-storying and stuff. But yeah, with Instagram it is quite hard because you kind of do need to find the line and my friends who aren't in this world are like, "Do you not... How do you do that? The whole Instagram you've just got people that you don't know necessarily watching things and seeing things and do you need to plan your posts?" And they say, "Would you have a personal account?" And I'm like, "Well not really because I kind of post, I'll post holiday pictures from family holidays or with my boyfriend and stuff anyway on my page." And I don't think I spend too much time on Instagram to be honest, I post and I have my few pages that I love looking at, mostly dogs. To be honest I use Instagram for dogs for the most part.

Bronagh:

We can be friends.

Call Me Loop:

It's a lot of just sending direct messages of puppies to friends and boyfriend and brother.

Milly:

Maybe next time we should just bring a puppy to this.

Call Me Loop:   

You should do that.

Milly:                               

We'll bring you back.

Call Me Loop:                       

Oh my god, that'd be amazing.

Bronagh:                         

And what are your fan base like? Who are your fans?

Call Me Loop:                       

My fans, I would say are age average would probably be about like 16 to 30. And a lot of the LGBT community so that's probably the most part, which is a bit older I think than some people think my fans are. But for the most part, like I do shows at 18+ and the majority of my fans can come, which is great. And then we did the tour was 14+, so that was nice, it opens it up to a few more people. But yeah, boys and girls is pretty much equal I think, which is also fab.

Bronagh:

And would you say that social media has been a help in that sense where you can, you're discoverable in that way or you can build a fan base?

Call Me Loop:                       

I think so. Yeah, and I do actually love, like I chat to my fans a lot on Instagram, which I love and I think because lots of my songs are quite sassy and empowering, they help my fans through hard times. So often they'll reach out to me during those and that just makes me... I'll get messages saying, "Thank you, you helped me through something tough." And that's obviously amazing to hear. Every now and then I think, "Am I doing enough with music? Should I be helping, doing more for the world kind of thing? But when you get little things like that, you're like, "Okay, well it's good."

Milly:                               

I've touched someone.

Call Me Loop:                       

Yeah, it's worth it, it's nice.

Bronagh:                       

I was watching an interview last night with Timbaland and he was talking about his career and I didn't really... Well, I knew that... Actually, no, I didn't know that him and Missy Elliot went to school together.

Milly:

Did they?

Call Me Loop:   

I didn't know that                      

Bronagh:                            

Yeah. And that Pharrell was also in the same school as them.

Milly:

Stop, why didn't we go to the school? It seems like the place to be.

Bronagh:                          

And so I find that quite interesting how important his peers were in his career and feeling inspired by his peers. And I just wondered, do you have people within the industry who you feel a connection with? Or, is it an open industry in that sense where there's a couple of people that you might share ideas with? Or...

Call Me Loop:                       

Yeah, I think for the most part, again, I think this is something that people act like everybody's pitched against each other, especially female artists and female writers and stuff. But my experience is that everybody's actually really supportive and yeah, I know friends who host dinner parties or listening evenings and things so that people can just come together and talk about their ideas or talk about their stresses, which is really lovely and it is needed. Because like I say, most of my old friends, my friends from youth, none of them do anything like this. So they find it quite hard to relate to some of the stuff that I do, they're like, "So you go into a room and you just sit down with people you don't know and you write a song?" They're like, "What?" So yeah. So it's great to have those kinds of people that you can... And also people that you write with frequently, so you go in and you just automatically feel at ease and you know exactly how you work together. That's always great.

Bronagh:                             

And what is a regular day for you or is there ever a regular day? Because again, before we were recording you said, "Oh, I just wonder what it'd be like to work in an office," and I was like, "You're not missing anything."

Call Me Loop:                       

I mean I've done office jobs before and obviously some better than others, but I think because I'm quite a sociable person, and that's one thing about music. Sometimes some of your days are quite isolated. In the studio, obviously you're with people, but it may only be one or two and it may be people that you don't know that well and you're just with them for the day and it'll still be fun. You're writing a song, but it's very different being with your work mates if you're in an office. And you're with them every day and you've got your kind of groups.

Milly:                               

camaraderie type of thing.

Call Me Loop:                       

Yeah, exactly. But no, studio, maybe three times a week, try and get up and go to the gym beforehand if I can, because studio doesn't usually start until 11:00 or 1:002 and then other days it'll be life admin, work admin, shoots, meetings, rehearsals, gigs and stuff. So they're often quite different, but there's a bit of routine most weeks.

Bronagh:                        

And so tell us what you're working on at the minute.

Call Me Loop:                       

At the moment, well after this actually I'm going to finish the next single, going to revocal it and just work on a few production tweaks. So, that's exciting. So then that'll be mixed and mastered next week and good to go. So I'm really excited about that.

Milly:                            

Is that the February, January time one? That's exciting.

Call Me Loop:                       

Yes, exactly. I reckon it will be around the end of Jan that it comes out. So, I'm working on, so we're going to be shooting the artwork and everything for that before Christmas. So it's just that really. Some more writing because at the moment I feel like I'm in a bit of a good spot with my writing, so I just want to make the most of that before Christmas. And then next year single will come out, we'll do a little single launch party or gig or something for the fans. And then I think I may be going to LA to write for the first time in spring, which will be fun. And then it'll be festivals and shows and the next single out in March hopefully. And yeah, we've got the whole plan for 2020 which is nice.

Call Me Loop:                       

I took basically these last six months to write and get everything in place because I'd been putting music out quite consistently for the last, well probably two years. I hadn't really had more than like two, three month break between songs. So it's been quite nice to just reset so that we can start off next year with a bang.

Bronagh:                            

Amazing. And so what have been some of the highlights so far?

Call Me Loop:                       

So they kind of obviously, as you progress they change. But I still remember my first highlight was when Looking At You was put out. So that was my first official single and that got into New Music Friday Global, got to New Music Friday on Spotify and it got 100,000 listens overnight. And I remember just getting the email from my label manager and I was in the pub with my family and I was like, "Is this is a typo." And that was the moment when I was like, shit, okay, this feels like this could actually be the start of something. It feels tangible. It's within reach. So I always remember that moment.

Milly:                           

I hope you got the drinks in, had a little celebration.

Call Me Loop:                       

I was like, "Dad, could you get this round?"

Milly:                               

Haven't got paid yet.

Call Me Loop:                       

Unfortunately yeah, nothing quite yet. And then setting up my first headline show, that was amazing. A few weeks before it happens. That was really exciting.

Bronagh:                               

Do you set goals for yourself?

Call Me Loop:                     

Probably not. Yes, but probably not as strictly as I should. My dad always tells me to do this. He's like, "You need to put your business head on and set your three month goals, your six month goals." I obviously have ideas of where I want to be when, but I don't probably lay them out as strictly as I should because I do think-

Bronagh:                              

It can be hard in creative jobs as well.

Call Me Loop:                       

Yeah. But I think it is so important because unless you set them, you don't have any benchmark and you really do need to make sure that you and everybody around you is doing what they should be doing and how are you going to get... And if you set the goal, you then work backwards. You're like, "How do we get there? Okay. We need to do this by this time." And, so I do think it's important, but this is me preaching something that I'm definitely not doing quite as well as I should. But yeah.

Bronagh:                            

And tell us who are your biggest influences right now and maybe what is your favourite track of the moment?

Call Me Loop:                       

Ooh.

Milly:                            

That's a hard one.

Call Me Loop:                       

Biggest influences. I honestly think it changes day by day, but I am loving Labyrinth's new album at the moment. I just am obsessed with him.

Milly:                              

I keep listening to it like on repeat.

Call Me Loop:                       

He's just so... He was actually rehearsing in the same studio complex as me a few weeks back and I was being like, "I'm just going to go out into the corridor and go for a cup of tea."

Milly:                             

Just wander.

Call Me Loop:                       

I didn't get to see him.

Milly:                         

If I bump into him...

Call Me Loop:                       

But yeah, his album's amazing. I just think he's a phenomenal talent and also that Euphoria soundtrack. So good. Favourite track. I mean Dua Lipa's Don't Start Now is a banger.

Milly:                           

It gets right in your head

Call Me Loop:                       

Yeah. That's the first one that comes to mind. But it's also one of those ones where I feel like I've been listening, you know when you just hear it all the time? I'm going to reach a point where I'm like, "Okay, I need to move on to something else now."

Milly:                            

Yeah, I need to have a break.

Bronagh:                                

Okay. And so for anyone who's listening, who maybe doesn't follow you already, where can they find your stuff?

Call Me Loop:                       

All the usual places like Music on Spotify, Apple, et cetera, et cetera, and Instagram, Twitter, everything is just @callmeloop.

Bronagh:                               

Amazing.

Call Me Loop:                       

Very easy, same everywhere.

Bronagh:                          

Well, thank you so much for joining us today and everyone go out and stream and buy and support.

Milly:                           

Get ready for January. [crosstalk 00:26:39].

Bronagh:                            

But thank you.

Call Me Loop:                       

Thanks guys.

Milly:                        

Thanks.

Bronagh:                             

Thank you so much for listening to the Influence Room Podcast. If you want to learn more about the site, you can follow us on Instagram @theinfluenceroom and check out our website and become a member if you're not already. We are really excited to hear about what you're doing, what you're passionate about, the stories you want to tell, and become part of the Contra Economy.

Recent Posts